Housing Takes Another Hit

Just when we think it’s getting better, the news comes out that we are in for a double-dip in housing prices. Last year in 2010 things were starting to look up in many municipalities as sales were brisk and housing prices were even starting to inch up again. This year, though, the situation has turned from hopeful to grim. Now it appears that the price increases of last year were mainly due to the home buyers’ housing credit extended by the U.S. Congress to buoy the market. Buoy it they did, but now we’re in for a let-down. In September of 2010 as the last of the home buyer credit buyers closed on their properties, housing started to slide. Of course, it’s natural for sales of homes to slide  after Halloween and throughout the winter, especially in cold-weather states, but this year’s slide began earlier and lasted longer.

Compounding the problem was the “robo-signing” scandal which halted foreclosures for several months last fall. Regular sales and short sales continued to pile up as inventory on a stagnant market, then the banks resumed their foreclosures. Foreclosures hit at perhaps a more rapid rate as banks rushed to close out their books at the end of the year. Now, at the end of February, here in Southern California we have not only a huge inventory, but I would even characterize it as a glut of properties clogging up the market.

Another issue adding to the misery is the difficulty borrowers are having obtaining financing. After the bailout, as we all know, banks, instead of spreading the wealth around as was intended, instead simply stopped lending.  Belatedly  realizing their folly during the bubble years, banks, always ponderously slow and bureaucratic, finally reacted–by clamping down on lending! Too late, banks. It has been estimated that half the population now has bad credit due to the recession in one form another, either a short sale, foreclosure, bankruptcy, late payments on credit cards  or, at a minimum, too much debt.  Lenders now will not lend to these people

For an analysis of what the near future holds for lending, check out my Pasadena Short Sale Blog. Hint: it’s another downer.

All of these factors have played a part in the current housing glut and consequent stasis. The inevitable result will be–yet lower prices as banks, short sellers and those who must sell for one reason or another, all compete with one another for the few buyers out there.  Already this year, analysts have indicated that the scant 2.25% gain in L.A. housing last year has been wiped out. Some experts are predicting that we are in for another dip of approximately 15%. I am not in the prognostication business, but I can say that it’s not looking good.

Already from 2006-2008 many cities in five states, California, Nevada, Arizona and Florida and Michigan, according to Federal Housing Finance Agency data, have lost significant value in housing. Starting with Stockton, which lost 75% of its housing value in those two years, the dreadful list continues with Modesto at negative 73%, Vallejo negative 64%, Salinas at negative 60%. These are horrible numbers. Imagine losing 75% of the value of your home in just two years through no fault of your own!

The roll of California cities continues with Riverside-San Berdo-Ontario tied with Bakersfield  at negative 47%, Fresno at negative 45%, Sacramento area at 44%, Oxnard-Thousand Oaks at 41%, Santa-Barbara-Santa Maria-Goleta tied with Santa Rosa at negative 40%. The l ist goes on-Oakland area -38%, Santa Ana-Anaheim-Irvine -36%,LA-Long Beach-Glendale -32, San Luis Obispo-Paso Robles -29% and even Santa Cruz-Watsonville lost 29% in two years.

That just us. Of course, Vegas lost 54% of its value in those years and is still hemorrhaging. Reno-Sparks lost 41%; Phoenix-Mesa-Glendale was down 31% and is still falling. Then, like California only worse because it has a less diversified economy, is Florida which was and still is a disaster zone. Cape Coral-Fort Myers lost 60% of its value, followed by Naples-Marco Island at 54%  negative, Ft. Lauderdale -45%, West Palm Beach-Boca Raton down 45% and on and on.

That was the story three years ago. Much as we would like to say it’s getting better, really, it’s not over yet.

 

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