L.A. County Housing Prices for May 2008

Think things are getting better? Not really…at least not in the housing market. The good part is that homes are actually selling. The bad part for homeowners is that prices continue to slide.

Median home prices in L.A. County–remember it’s one of the biggest, if not THE biggest county in the entire country–are down 26% from May 2007 to $435,000.
Some parts of the county are far below that–Palmdale, down a whopping 46% to a median of $170,000, La Canada/Flintridge down 36% to a measley $905,000 median, Maywood down 45% to $286,000. There are others, of course, but the outlying areas are hardest hit, followed by working-class cities where folks are the first to feel the effects of a recession in job loss.

Of course, our government continues to tell us we’re not in recession with facts and figures to prove it. For most of us out here in the trenches, it sure feels like a recession.

What about the San Gabriel Valley? How are we doing? For the most part, we are doing better than average. Azusa is down 26% to a median of $334,000. That’s an average percentage drop for the country and Azusa’s median price was always lower. Baldwin Park, LaPuente, Pomona and El Monte are all down more than average [30%, 28%,28%, 34% respectively]. The new medians in those cities are $311,000; $315,000; $295,000; $307,000. All are lower than the county median and always were. Again, these are lower-income communities where the recession will hit first. The foreclosure crisis is hitting here hardest as well.

Then, what about the rest of the San Gabriel Valley? Well, the rest is mostly better than the county average, though home prices are still considerably lower than last year. Covina in all ZIPs is down about 20% to around $400,000. Glendora in 91740 is down 20% to $390,000 while 91741 is down 16% to $496,000. Most Pasadena ZIPs are down. Diamond Bar is down 17% to $557,000.

In some of the better news, some cities are down by far less than the county average. Claremont is down, but only by 13% to $485,000. San Dimas is down 15% to $434,000 and LaVerne is down 14% to $527,000. The shifts from month to month are mainly due to the number of homes sold. And which homes are sold. More and more now, only the lowest-priced homes are selling quickly or the highest-priced homes which are, nevertheless, priced considerably less than last year.

East L.A. County even has a couple of success stories. San Marino continues to do well, rising 15% over last year to a median of $1,800,000. Pasadena’s prestigious 91105 is up 16% to $1,800,000 and 91106 is up 18.5% to $736,000. Well done, Pasadena! Whittier is down in all ZIPs, except 90601 which is up 6% to $491,000.

What does this good news say? To me, it says that buyers are just waiting to snap up bargains, even to the point of driving prices up to get into desirable neighborhoods. The proof is in the rest of L.A. County where other areas are also increasing in value–Rancho Palos Verdes, Palos Verdes Peninsula, Bel-Air, Venice, though areas perceived as over-priced are still losing–Brentwood, Beverly Hills, most of Santa Monica, Malibu...

Values are shifting. Buyers are selecting bargains and leaving the rest.

The lesson? If you’re a buyer, now’s a good time to buy, particularly as mentioned in a previous post, mortgage rates are starting to rise. For homeowners who are happy in their homes–please ignore this and just continue to live there. Prices will rise again in a few years. If you do want to sell, though, you must price your property appropriately or it will never sell.

Update on Prop 98 NO, Prop 99 Yes

Well, once again the forces of light have prevailed against the dark as the people of California have resoundingly defeated Prop 98 and voted for Prop 99. Perhaps the era of tricking the dummy voters has really passed and proponents of such measures will have to clarify exactly what their measures will mean in the future. As it is, smart voters have got their number.

Statewide, the NO vote to Prop 98 was 61% to a meager 39% yes, so the defeat of this tricky measure was overwhelming. To seal the deal, voters came out 63% YES on Prop 99 to 38% no. Voters clearly DID understand what they were voting for and made their feelings completely clear. L.A. County, which does have several large cities which voted in rent control years ago, including the City of Los Angeles itself and Santa Monica, followed statewide trends in voting almost identically. Orange County, predictably, was split almost 50/50, while San Bernardino, Riverside and Ventura Counties all more or less reflected statewide proportions.

What does it all mean? It means for sure that Orange County is apparently at war with its previous incarnation as a far-right bastion. Maybe we’ll see some surprises there in the next election which is, of course, the BIG ONE in November. It may mean that statewide voters are sick of tricky politics. It may also mean simply that voters were willing to delineate eminent domain back to the point we had all thought it belonged prior to the Supreme Court’s shocker Kelso decision in 2005. It may also mean that statewide voters think that rent control decisions belong with the individual communities where they have always been.

So, if you want to abolish rent control, do it in your local city council. If you don’t have the patience or can’t see that happening where you own property, then, the best choice is to buy rental property in areas where there is no rent control. Those areas include almost all the San Gabriel Valley, from Pasadena, Monrovia, Arcadia to Glendora, Azusa, Pomona, Claremont as well as San Bernardino and Riverside County cities. I am here to help. Right now, we have outstanding properties available in Pasadena…In fact, amazing deals. Just give me a call at 626-641-0346.

April Prices for San Gabriel Valley & L.A. County

Here we are almost to June, and now we have the April real estate prices for L.A.County.

As we’ve come to expect, prices are DOWN. For April 2008 as compared to April 2007, prices are down 21%. Since last year the sub-prime crisis hit in August and lenders almost stopped lending for about 7 months, we can expect that downward total to keep plummeting until at least August 2008. And, yes, prices will keep going downward, though at a slower rate until the end of 2008 and into 2009.

Again, as mentioned in previous posts, this is not so shabby really as prices were rising at a rate of 20% and in some places almost 30% for four years straight. The Affordability Index sank to an all-time low and sales stagnated. Now, at least, led by foreclosures and short sales, prices are down to more affordable levels for buyers. And, buyers, especially first-timers, so vital to a healthy real estate market and missing in action for years are returning.

So, where are we this month? L.A. County prices are down 21% for single family homes to a median of $450,000 and condos are down 14% to a median of $307,000. Given the vastness of L.A. County, that doesn’t mean much because everything depends on location.

Thus, Malibu prices are down 20% to a median of $1,735,000, while Pomona’s three zip codes are down 36.7% to a median of $273,000–big difference…. Then, we have Rancho Palos Verdes, a seeming winner just a couple of months ago, down almost 19% to a median of $968,000. Compare that to Baldwin Park down 21.7% to a median of $365,000.

So, which areas are the big winners? There are very few…In the San Gabriel Valley, San Marino’s values jumped 20% to a median of $1,465,000; San Dimas managed a 7% increase in value to a median of $530,000. Claremont and Glendora [91741] eked out a 3% increase to a median of $550,000 and $619,000 respectively. Way to go! Other cities increasing in value include parts of Santa Monica, Beverly Hills, Culver City and Hermosa Beach.

The rest of county posts pretty grim numbers—unless you are a buyer, of course.
Pomona was one of the hardest hit in this area followed by Arcadia [down over 20% to a median of $696,000 averaging its 3 zips], Azusa [ down 23% to a median of $355,000], Covina [down 24.4% to a median of $401,000 averaging its 3 zips] and the beat goes on… Diamond Bar is down 7% to $560,000; Duarte is down 8% to $442,000; even Sierra Madre lost almost 30% to a median of $680,000, while Monrovia is down 9% to $543,000. La Verne leads the pack with a whooping 31% loss in value to a median of $450,000. Pasadena has lost double-digit value in every single area even prestigious 91105.

To better understand what is happening, we do need to keep in mind several factors. First, home owners in some of the originally more inexpensive areas such as Baldwin Park, Covina, Pomona have more modest incomes and so are more likely to suffer in the current economic downturn, losing their homes to foreclosure in greater numbers. Foreclosure sales are about the only game in town at this point, and so are leading the downward price trends in the more inexpensive areas as first-time buyers come into the market.

Conflicting information for properties in more desirable areas–San Marino way up, for instance, while neighboring Arcadia and South Pasadena are way down, San Dimas is up while La Verne is way down when both share the same school district–is more problematic. Often, as with Rancho Palos Verdes, for instance, a few more months of statistics will give us a better idea. Initially, RPV looked immune to the crisis, but as this month’s stats show, it’s turned out to be every bit as vulnerable as neighboring Redondo Beach down about 21% over its 2 zip codes. Time will tell what is really going on.

Where Are Those REPOs?

For Southern Californians, the short answer: right where you live.

In the San Gabriel Valley, homes which are REOs, short pays, NODs, short sales or corporate owned are everywhere. In fact, at this point, they are the only properties selling and often even these bargain properties offered far below the prices they sold for just one or two years ago are on the market 100 days or more.

Just where are these properties? Here’s a short list compiled in haste from the Multiple Listing Service [MLS] access to which I offer on my website www.DianeButler.net.

City Properties Range
Arcadia 12 $450000-$1,500,000
Azusa 70 $179,900-$914,900
Claremont 15 $249,000-$579,000
Covina 77 $215,000-$675,000
Duarte 22 $261,000-$610,000
Glendora 17 $300,000-$855,000
La Verne 17 $212,500-$749,000
Monrovia 23 $320,000-$649,000
Pasadena 77 $185,000-$790,000
Rancho Cucamonga >319 $105,000-$1,290,000
San Dimas 15 $330,000-$1,400,000
Sierra Madre 1 $358000
Upland 88 $135,000-$999,900

Look at those prices!

These are amazing prices that we haven’t seen in this area for literally years. $105,000? Wow! Many of the cheapest listed here are one-bedroom condos, but, still, a year ago even they were commanding prices over $200,000 or $300,000 pretty much everywhere.

Pasadena ,by far the largest city, so has a very large number of foreclosures. That $185,000, by the way, is a studio. Still. Rancho is also a large city, but 319? That is what it is like in San Bernardino/Riverside County, as delineated here previously. To my mind, some of the most undervalued homes and so the best deals are in Covina which with 77 repos is out of step with the other foothill communities. Azusa is another surprise.

Most of the repos concentrate at the lower end, but there are some truly beautiful homes in the mix, many with 5 bedrooms and commanding views of the valley. Despite these prices, however, many of these homes listed at seemingly rock-bottom prices are not selling.

Right now is a fabulous time to buy. Among these repos are some fantastic values which will not get any better. Like anything else, the buyer who gets the great deal needs to do his homework and plod through those 319 listings in Rancho to find the real gems.

What’s Happening With Rosedale?

The long-running  soap opera featuring  Azusa, Glendora and the Monrovia Nursery has gone into stasis for the time being. Azusa had planned to build a complex community called Rosedale on the land formerly owned by the Monrovia Nursery, familiar to all residents who travel Sierra Madre Blvd.

Chalk another one up to the sub-prime crisis. Lacking ready capital, all developers, with the exception of Christopher Homes, have quietly folded up their tents and left the area. Some are trying to sell their parcels at bargain prices with no takers. Long story short–for now and into the foreseeable future, Rosedale is dead.  The epic battle royale between Azusa and Glendora is over–not with a knock out or even a technical–it’s been called off altogether. Come back in three years, the hiatus may be over.

As for Sierra Madre Blvd,  closed for quite some time, will be finished with developers’ funds.   The City of Azusa wisely had required the funds deposited before any construction could begin. A few other projects will get their funding as well, but that’s it.

 We may not see the beautiful bougainvillea back on the hillsides as in Monrovia’s time, but we will also forego the added traffic, pollution and congestion.