What Is The Best Investment Property? Part 2

Besides the considerations of Part 1 in  the previous post, price ,  tenants and condition, the investor has to investigate thoroughly before purchasing anything. In fact, the main job of the investor is not getting the money together, which, admittedly, can be  very tough, or running around looking at various deals, which does takes time and shoe leather.  No, the most important job for the investor is doing the due diligence.

We often hear that expression, “You’ve got to do your homework” or do the due diligence. For real estate, what does due diligence entail exactly? As might be expected with such a vague term, it’s complicated. To me, though, it can be simplified by dividing your due diligence into pre-purchase and during-purchase due diligence. Whatever happens, you don’t want your due diligence to happen post-purchase.

location_location_location

Location, Location, Location

Of course, that’s the most basic mantra of real estate and it certainly should be part of any investor’s pre-purchase due diligence. The location of the property will determine the rents and the quality of the tenants, so it is of utmost importance.

What is a desirable rental location?

Many would-be investors think that a newer building in their own suburb is an ideal investment. This may or may not be true. If the suburb is filled with homeowners, it’s likely that it’s not an ideal place for renters. Here are few questions to ask when considering location?

  • where do most residents work?
  • is public transportation handy?
  • is there adequate parking?
  • what is the area vacancy rate?

If most locals commute to the city, then renters will, too. That means most renters will seek housing closer to their work. Many renters do not have cars, so proximity to public transportation is a must. Whether tenants have cars or not, for most areas the building must have adequate parking. This means at least one space and preferably two per unit plus one or two extra for guests. Failing that, overnight street parking must be available. Make sure the vacancy rate is not above 5% as nothing costs a landlord more than vacancies, especially multiple vacancies.

Sometimes areas near a military base or adjacent to colleges and universities offer wonderful rental opportunities which are, nevertheless, different from “normal” rentals. Frequently, in such areas rentals are for six months or two semesters or a summer and then over and out. This might entail more work prepping the units more often,  but  the rents are actually higher. Usually, too, students and soldiers are not particularly fussy about their short-term digs.

cash-flow

Often, would-be investors start out looking for the “best” properties. That is usually a mistake. The best rental properties are usually in moderate to low-moderate areas which are not only more likely to attract renters, but which also offer what every investor should be seeking-immediate cash flow. Cash flow is the name of the game and more expensive properties in the best areas rarely offer it. Also, those moderate renters are more likely to stay put than the higher-paying renters with plenty of options. Remember: vacancies are a landlord’s bane.